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Harrison vehicular homicide case continued again

Updated: Thursday, April 3 2014, 01:18 PM EDT

wtov9.com
HARRISON COUNTY, Ohio -- Bryan Liggett, a man accused of vehicular homicide stemming from a fatal, head-on collision last August, appeared in court Thursday for what was supposed to be his final pre-trial hearing before change or plea, or a trial.
The case, however, was continued again, with Harrison County Common Pleas Judge Shawn Hervey saying barring something earth-shattering, it will be the last before a decision must be made.
Liggett will be back in court on April 10 for a final pre-trial hearing. If there is still no change of plea or no decision on that date, the court will move forward with a jury trial just days later on April 16.
"This is a serious, grave matter that involves the death of an individual and we're not going to let this case go on very much longer," the judge said.
Liggett is being held accountable for his role in this fatal collision on US 22 in Harrison County last August. Authorities concluded Liggett crashed into another car driven by victim 36-year-old Bryan Westlake.
Liggett's history with substance abuse is extensive.
In 2004, he was convicted for driving under the influence.
Then the fatal crash in 2013, in which he was allegedly under the influence. Later last year, police say Liggett was arrested for driving, once again, under the influence.
Ohio State Troopers said Liggett had a metal spoon, needles, and what appeared to be heroin residue in his car.
His defense says he has a medical condition.
On Thursday, defense attorney Steven Stickes asked for additional time to discuss any future proceedings with his client.
"Unfortunately at this time, I'm going to ask the state for a change of plea hearing," Stickles said.
Hervey ultimately granted the motion but noted, the court doesn't take the delay lightly.
Liggett was indicted Sept. 12, 2013.
Prosecutor Michael Washington noted the utmost importance to make sure a defendant understands the charges he may or  may not plead guilty to.
"It's something that we need to make sure that the defendant, when he enters a plea, or when she enters a plea, that it's knowingly, intelligently, voluntarily," Washington said.

Harrison vehicular homicide case continued again


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